Recent Articles

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is still understood in different ways: as philanthropy, as a voluntary commitment to social issues, as a "green-washing" tool for multinationals, as a new model for sustainable business, or as an ideological attack on the free market economy. In fact, all these aspects are covered by one of the existing definitions. However, when we analyze the evolution of definitions, we also see a clear trend: over the past few decades, CSR has become a term that not only applies to large companies and their ethical behavior. Rather, it requires new decision-making processes from all organizations to respond to the increasingly recognized complexity of our world.

From Philanthropy to Impact Management

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is still understood in different ways: as philanthropy, as a voluntary commitment to social issues, as a "green-washing" tool for multinationals, as a new model for sustainable business, or as an ideological attack on the free market economy. In fact, all these aspects are covered by one of the existing definitions. However, when we analyze the evolution of definitions, we also see a clear trend: over the past few decades, CSR has become a term that not only applies to large companies and their ethical behavior. Rather, it requires new decision-making processes from all organizations to respond to the increasingly recognized complexity of our world.
by Leo Hauska